If your child is born in the United States, he or she will be a lawful citizen and will be eligible for all public benefits. Because you are the parent, you can apply for benefits for your child, even if you are not a citizen or a lawful resident.

 

The California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide has a special section dedicated to “Pregnant Immigrants and Immigrants with Children.” Did you know that when your child turns 21, he or she may be able to help you become a legal immigrant? And if your child has special needs, this may help you stay in the U.S. if you are being deported. (But it does not automatically make you eligible or stop Immigration from deporting you.)

 

To learn more, be sure to read the “Pregnant Immigrants and Immigrants with Children” section of the Guide.

 


The California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide has information on what the law says about working under the age of 18, and working while pregnant.

 

Generally you can get a job if you are under 18, but there are special rules. For example: you will need a work permit unless you have finished school; you must stay in school until you are 18, graduate, or get a certificate of proficiency; and your work hours are limited during the school year.

 

If you are pregnant, there are many jobs you can do. It is against the law for someone to not hire (or to fire) you because you are pregnant. Your boss must make reasonable changes if you need them to do your job while you are pregnant.

 

If you think your employer treated you unfairly because you are pregnant or just had a baby, there are resources that can help.

 

If you are not a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, you will need a work permit from your school, and an immigration work permit (called an Employment Authorization Document) from the Department of Homeland Security for some jobs. But you do not need a permit for informal, temporary jobs like babysitting, errands, or yard work.

 

The Guide’s section on Working answers questions like:

 

  • How do I look for a job?
  • Do I have the right to take time off when I’m pregnant and when my baby is born?
  • Can I definitely get my old job back after the baby is born?
  • How can I work and take care of my baby?
  • Can I miss work if my baby or I get sick?
  • Can I get a job if I am not a U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident?
  • Will my employer check my immigration status?

 

Read teen mom LaDawn’s thoughts on working as a minor in a previous blog post.

 

Find out more about working as a minor, working while pregnant or as a parent, or how your immigration status affects your ability to work in the Guide’s Working section.

 


The California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide and website are broken down into four broad sections to help teens like you, your partners and families make the best possible decisions.  It’s written in a straightforward Q&A format, and simply, clearly and without bias providing information on laws, programs and policies affecting pregnant and parenting youth.

 

Answers to questions like these are in the Special Situations section:

 

  • Can I get an abortion while in a juvenile detention center?
  • I’m a parent of a pregnant 16-year-old, what do I need to know?

 

You can read all about teen mom Zoe’s experience with foster care in this blog post.

 

Are you a teen mom or dad with thoughts or comments to share?  If so, leave them in the comments section below and join the conversation!


Dipti Singh is a staff attorney for the National Health Law Program (NHeLP), a partner in promoting the Guide for Pregnant and Parenting Youth in California. She is sharing with us a true story. NHeLP assisted in providing the correct answer for the teen. For privacy purposes, the names have been changed. You can find guidance for these types of situations in the Guide.

 

Pilar is an undocumented teen. She wanted to start birth control, but did not want to tell her parents.

 

She went to a Medi-Cal worker for help. The Medi-Cal representative told Pilar that she could not obtain birth control through any state program because she is undocumented. The representative also told her that that she needed to get her parents’ permission in order to receive birth control.

 

Pilar turned to an advocate from a legal non-profit organization, who found the right answers for Pilar through NHeLP.

 

Can Pilar get birth control without telling her parents?

 

Yes. Pilar can access birth control through the Family PACT program.

 

Pilar does not need her parents’ permission to obtain birth control. California has a minor consent program that covers confidential services like this one. Under it, a minor of any age may consent to medical care related to the prevention or treatment of pregnancy. The state or county will not contact the teen’s family without her permission.

 

Her immigration status does not matter, as long as she is a resident of California.

 

Have more questions? Check out the Sex and Pregnancy and Special Situations sections of the Guide.

 

 


The California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide includes information about legal rights for pregnant and parenting undocumented youth, permanent residents and their families. The post below explains in Spanish, in greater detail what you can find in the “Special Situations” section of the Guide.

 

La Guía Para Jóvenes Embarazadas Y Jóvenes Con Hijos En California incluye información para jóvenes indocumentados, residentes permanentes, y sus familias sobre sus derechos legales acerca de su embarazo.

 
La Guía faculta a las adolescentes y a sus familias para que conozcan sus derechos y comiencen a encontrar los recursos disponibles para apoyarlas. Bajo las “Situaciones Especiales,” encontraran información sobre inmigración, incluyendo preguntas críticas como:

 

  • ¿Y si no puedo pagar a un abogado?

 

 

Si tienes preguntas sobre tu embarazo y tu estatus inmigratorio, no te detengas y lea esta sección de la Guía. Esta entrevista en Univisión también ofrece más información sobre inmigración. Para recursos en su condado, busque aquí.

 

 

 


The California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide and website are broken down into four broad sections to help teens like you, your partners and families make the best possible decisions. It’s written in a straightforward Q&A format, and simply, clearly and without bias provides information about laws, programs and policies affecting pregnant and parenting youth.

 

Answers to questions like these are in the Managing Your Life section:

 

 

What information do you think is most important for pregnant and parenting teens to have about managing life? Do you have experiences to share? If so, leave a comment below and join the conversation!

 


The Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide was featured on KMEX Los Angeles’ morning program, Primera Edición. Click on the video below to watch the Guide’s own Sandra and Michelle discuss resources and other helpful information in Spanish.

 

La Guía Para Jovenes Embarazadas Y Jovenes Con Hijos En California está diseñada como una herramienta de prevención para ayudar a que las jóvenes de California, sus parejas y familias tomen las mejores decisiones posibles. Recientemente tuvimos la oportunidad de llevar el mensaje de la Guía a Univisión.

 

 

Representantes de la Guía, Sandra, Michelle y la joven Aurora, fueron entrevistadas en la estación KMEX de Los Ángeles en el programa Primera Edición. Ellas hablaron sobre la tremenda necesidad por un recurso como la Guía, los temas legales incluidos en la Guía y los programas del gobierno que pueden ayudar a los jóvenes.

 

Sandra le explico a Univisión que la Guía existe para brindar información a los jóvenes, “Muy a menudos ellos no tienen a donde ir. No saben con quien hablar, entonces tienen mucho miedo muchas veces de hablar con sus padres o no saben donde ir a agarrar estas respuestas a muchas de las preguntas que tienen.”

 

Michelle ofreció mas detalles sobre los temas que toca la Guía, incluyendo información para jóvenes indocumentados, temas legales como custodia y visitación, y programas del gobierno que podrían ayudar a jóvenes.

 

“Hemos visto que las adolecentes embarazadas y los padres jóvenes tienen un riesgo mayor de dejar a la escuela,” explico Michelle. “Por eso la Guía contiene información sobre como las jóvenes embarazadas pueden seguir en la escuela, continuar en la misma escuela si desean o elegir otra escuela.”

 

Para leer la Guia en español, haz clic aquí.